Pressure Canning Organic Dry Beans

To start off I have to admit that I didn’t come up with this nifty idea… just found it elsewhere online. But wanted to share… it’s fantastic!
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I have previously been frustrated with my efforts to pressure can dry beans. Whether pinto or turtle, garbanzos or Great Northerns, the silly things always come out terribly messy and mooshy. The currently accepted method of home canning beans involves pre-soaking and then cooking for 30 minutes before loading into hot jars. By the time you finish the suggested 90 minute processing time, your beans are pre-fried. 🙂 Yuk. Not that I don’t enjoy refried beans as well as anyone who ever lived in Texas, but, I want my chickpeas/garbanzos to LOOK like chickpeas/garbanzos. I want a Great Northern to have a shape, a navy bean to salute, a black-eyed pea to wink at me. Well, you know what I mean.
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Enter the PREVIOUSLY accepted method of home canning beans.

Ready for the canner

Ready for the canner


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Yes, those beans are dry, uncooked, unsoaked… or they were, before they were loaded 1/2 cup at a time into clean pint jars (warm from a recent scrubbing bath, but not boiling hot), had seasonings added (in this case, the green-tinted jars had 1/2 tsp summer savory added), then boiling water poured over them. Seal them with your warm lids and rings, load them up in the canner.
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Placed in pre-heated pressure canner

Placed in pre-heated pressure canner


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Process according to pressure cooker directions (full steam vent for 10 minutes, apply weight – in my case, 15# due to elevation here in Montana, then begin timing) for 90 minutes for pint jars. I haven’t tried this with quart jars yet, as I expect that the more densely-packed beans may take longer to absorb liquid. Let the canner cool down on it’s own and release pressure before removing lid.
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GE DIGITAL CAMERA
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I just can’t bring myself to pay over $3/can for organic beans… but I use beans ALOT. And I like to cook what inspires me, so pre-planning and going through the process of cooking a pot of beans in the morning (having soaked overnight, or done the 2-hour quick soak method) doesn’t always work for me. I like to have beans to make a quick soup (or to bean-up the soup I’ve already made, or stretch leftovers), to top a salad, to provide a fast side dish… beans are inexpensive (if you’re not buying them already canned) and great for us. So spending an afternoon running the canner saves me time and money later.
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From start (with equipment, beans, clean jars all assembled) to finish (pulling the bubbling jars from the cooled-down canner) takes me about 3 hours and 30 minutes. Since I have two canners (I’m rich! I’m rich!!) I can get 18 pint jars of beans in the same length of time! But even with a single canner, 9 pints is an excellent return on the investment of your time, since you can easily do other things while the canner is roaring away on the stove. It’s a great way to spend a wintery day… do try to keep outside doors opening and closing to a minimum, as you want to maintain a steady temperature in the kitchen to prevent pressure changes within the canner… these can result in liquid boiling out of the jars during canning.

Now that's a bean!

Now that’s a bean!


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Pressure Canning Dry Beans
PINT JARS

1/2 cup dry beans (of any type)
1/2 tsp sea salt or other canning-type salt
seasonings as desired (garlic, savory, black pepper, etc)

1 – Add ingredients to warm pint jars.
2 – Cover with boiling water or broth to 1″ from rim. Be careful to be no more or less than this for best results!
3 – Process for 90 minutes at pressure recommended for your elevation (10# for sea level, 15# above 3,000).

Remember when you reheat your beans to eat them that they love a little fat for best digestibility – a nice glug of olive oil, for example! Bon Appetit!

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